Kelsey Braun’s Artist Talk

Please note that some of the spoken text in this artist presentation is intentionally obscured in order to draw attention to the sonic materials that were used in both it, as well as the exhibition. For video documentation of the exhibit please visit HERE.

Nest…..as a hiding place in the sky considered space as an illusion, as that which shifts between the perceivable and the peripheral—we can often hear the birds but cannot see the nest. Constructed from a foundation of sound extracted out of field recordings, foley, found-audio and gestures of sonic improvisation, this work was a multi-channel composition for a room. Nest…. intends on establishing an ocean of vibration where time and space are nudged towards an obtuse and poetically shifting experience. Speakers dispersed throughout the gallery underline one’s sense of proximity and complement the room’s physical material—in some cases transmitting sound from within the building itself. Nest…. encouraged a heightened sense of hearing, relating the aural to architecture, social space and memory.

Kelsey presented materials related to the exhibition through a hybrid performance/artist talk, followed by a play-through of the immersive audio installation. The audience was welcome to come and go as they pleased. 

Kelsey gratefully acknowledges the generous support of the Manitoba Arts Council, the Winnipeg Arts Council, and Video Pool Media Arts Centre.

Ran from March 8- April 5, 2019

Lucille Kim’s Artist Talk

Between Temporal and Permanent Histories of Pain examined memory and a sense of time encased by conditions of the human body. There, two projections overwhelmingly encompassed the room to allow an invitation, and an experience in Coin Therapy (‘coining’) that was performed in the videos. One of my mother and the other of my father, both bodies lay at rest and in motion on a serene white sheet. Each memory was subtly narrated by sounds that interrelate the visible and invisible scars under the violence and powerful rising of communist regimes in Cambodia during the 1970s to early 1980s. Either they were alone or together, distantly far apart or closely across from one another, the dual representation of a man and a woman in need of healing is blurred by a history of pain and powerlessness.

I would like to thank aceartinc. for their support and realization of my first solo exhibition. Most of all, I gratefully thank my mother and my father for their contribution, openness, and strength in the creation of each work.

Lucille Kim, born in 1992, is a Cambodian-Canadian artist based in Hamilton. She has a BFA degree from University of Toronto Mississauga (2015) where she immediately identified with certain concepts in the mediums of drawing and photography. In early 2018, her travel to Cambodia for the first time left her influenced by their lifestyle, materials, and landscapes as history and memory continue to be a part of her works that underlie the duality between pain and healing.

Connie Chappel’s Artist Talk

This multi-faceted exhibition used sculptural installation to combine curious material into experimental archaeological scenarios. Unusual juxtapositions of artificial and natural objects investigated the idiosyncrasies of organic growth, decay and exhumation processes. Cryptic memorials merged kinetic twigs and branches with static rocks and body parts. Quivering air currents enlivened suspended tree roots. An ambient glow beneath stain of sap drops on paper paid hommage to a meaningful birch wound. This living artifact display aimed to conceive a highly delicate, eerie and fantastical forest that found itself suspended in time.

The gallery space was a participant in this art historical allegory with works assembled in consideration of structure, corner, beam, space. Embodiment engaged observations of adaptation, diversity, self-generation, and material evidence of history having passed. Redeemed natural salvage unearthed human intervention in the otherwise inhabited world and embodies the inescapability of physical death.

Alyssa Bornn’s artist talk

Alyssa Bornn is an interdisciplinary artist, experimental filmmaker, and organizer based in Winnipeg, MB. Her practice regularly utilizes traditional photographic methods alongside alternative and outdated digital modes of image capturing, writing, and constructed spaces to explore the act of image building as well as our relationships to images.

She holds a BFA (Hons.) from the University of Maniotba and is a member of Open City Cinema, a co-programmer for the Winnipeg Underground Film Festival, and is an active member of Light Terrors- a loose collective showcasing moving image and audio works as live performance. She has run workshops for Platform Centre for Photographic + Digital Arts, PAVED Arts, and independently as Professional Development.

In 2018, Bornn was curated into the aceartinc. student exhibition and subsequently awarded the Scott Wachal Memorial Bursary. As part of this, recipients are invited to give a public talk about their work.

The Scott Wachal Memorial Bursary

This bursary is available to art students who have been curated into the Annual Student Exhibition. The bursary is intended to support a project or an opportunity (such as a workshop or residency) that will positively impact the artist’s practice. In 2013 the youngest artist curated into our Annual Student Exhibition passed away. In his memory aceartinc. created the Scott Wachal Memorial Student Bursary.

Sharon Alward’s Artist Talk

Alward is a Canadian video and performance artist. Cited as one of the 100 most influential and innovative Canadians in MacLean’s magazine for her work as a Canadian artist, her creative works reference performance, installation and ritual as potential sites for creativity and transformation. Actively involved in both art and social justice issues in the Winnipeg Community since 1986, Alward is also a Full Professor at the University of Manitoba, School of Art.

After a teaching and artistic career that spanned over 35 years Alward retired from the School of Art. Her artist talk Sparks looked back over three and a half decades of her teaching and creative works and she shared her reflections.

Toby Gillies’ Artist Talk

Seasons of Togetherness incorporated drawing, collage, and animation in an installation about human interaction and connection. Inspired by fantasies found within thrift-store relationship guidebooks, self-help Internet articles, and step-by-step illustrations, Gillies made a playful attempt to discover new ways to experience closeness with others and the world around. Source materials were abstracted through processes of re-creation and interpretation, amplifying both the awkward strangeness and beauty that exist within formalities of expressing.

Created through a practice of working intuitively and experimentally, the exhibition navigated a meandering course across themes of human connection, social convention, and ritual.

With the generous support of the Winnipeg Arts Council with funding from the City of Winnipeg.

Aruna D’Souza public talk

Aruna D’Souza writes about modern and contemporary art; intersectional feminisms and other forms of politics; and how museums shape our views of each other and the world. She recently published Whitewalling: Art, Race & Protest in 3 Acts. D’Souza’s free public talk was around the topics in her book and other related issues.

“Ta-Nehisi Coates’s seminal essay “The Case for Reparations” informed the ethos of her foray back into art writing. “I started to think about what a reparative model of art criticism would be for me, and I decided that my reparative gesture would be [through] attention,” she told me, and for D’Souza, that involves asking herself: “Who does my writing serve? Is it useful to the people I feel have been left out of many conversations? For me, a lot of what the book is about is the question of how to be an ally and how that has broken down in these various situations. It’s an exercise for me as a non-Black writer of colour: How can I write about Black protest? And what’s my role to centre the arguments of Black artists?”

– from: Profile by Merray Gerges, and excerpt from Whitewalling: Art, Race & Protest in 3 Acts. Canadian Art, May 3, 2018

D’Souza’s work appears regularly in 4Columns.org, where she is a member of the editorial advisory board, and has been published as well in The Wall Street Journal, CNN.com, Art News, Garage, Bookforum, Momus, Art in America, and Art Practical, among other places. Her book, Whitewalling: Art, Race, and Protest in 3 Acts was published by Badlands Unlimited in May 2018. She currently editing two forthcoming volumes, Making It Modern: A Linda Nochlin Reader, which will be published by Thames & Hudson, and A Presence Which Signals Absence: Lorraine O’Grady Collected Writings 1977-2018.

This talk was co-sponsored by the University of Winnipeg Institute for Women & Gender Studies, Creative Manitoba Indigenous programs, and aceartinc. with Plug In ICA, Gallery 1c03, and Border Crossings.

Aruna D’Souza public talk from aceartinc on Vimeo.