Aruna D’Souza public talk

Saturday 13th October 2018, 7 pm. aceartinc.

Aruna D’Souza writes about modern and contemporary art; intersectional feminisms and other forms of politics; and how museums shape our views of each other and the world. She recently published Whitewalling: Art, Race & Protest in 3 Acts. D’Souza will be talking about the topics in her book and related issues in a free public talk that welcomes everyone.

“Ta-Nehisi Coates’s seminal essay “The Case for Reparations” informed the ethos of her foray back into art writing. “I started to think about what a reparative model of art criticism would be for me, and I decided that my reparative gesture would be [through] attention,” she told me, and for D’Souza, that involves asking herself: “Who does my writing serve? Is it useful to the people I feel have been left out of many conversations? For me, a lot of what the book is about is the question of how to be an ally and how that has broken down in these various situations. It’s an exercise for me as a non-Black writer of colour: How can I write about Black protest? And what’s my role to centre the arguments of Black artists?”

– from: Profile by Merray Gerges, and excerpt from Whitewalling: Art, Race & Protest in 3 Acts. Canadian Art, May 3, 2018

D’Souza’s work appears regularly in 4Columns.org, where she is a member of the editorial advisory board, and has been published as well in The Wall Street Journal, CNN.com, Art News, Garage, Bookforum, Momus, Art in America, and Art Practical, among other places. Her book, Whitewalling: Art, Race, and Protest in 3 Acts was published by Badlands Unlimited in May 2018. She currently editing two forthcoming volumes, Making It Modern: A Linda Nochlin Reader, which will be published by Thames & Hudson, and A Presence Which Signals Absence: Lorraine O’Grady Collected Writings 1977-2018.

This talk is co sponsored by the University of Winnipeg Institute for Women & Gender Studies, Creative Manitoba Indigenous programs, and aceartinc. with Plug In ICA, Gallery 1c03, and Border Crossings.

Photo: Dana Hoey